Chat with us, powered by LiveChat The Complexity of Eating Disorder Recovery in the Digital Age Through this weeks Learning Resources, you become aware not only - School Writers

The Complexity of Eating Disorder Recovery in the Digital Age Through this weeks Learning Resources, you become aware not only

Discussion: The Complexity of Eating Disorder Recovery in the Digital Age

Through this week’s Learning Resources, you become aware not only of the prevalence of factors involved in the treatment of eating disorders, but also the societal, medical, and cultural influences that help individuals develop and sustain the unhealthy behaviors related to an eating disorder. These behaviors have drastic impacts on health. In clinical practice, social workers need to know about the resources available to clients living with an eating disorder and be comfortable developing interdisciplinary, individualized treatment plans for recovery that incorporate medical and other specialists.

For this Discussion, you focus on guiding clients through treatment and recovery.

To prepare:

  • Review the Learning Resources on experiences of living with an eating disorder, as well as social and cultural influences on the disorder.
  • Read the case provided by your instructor for this week’s Discussion.
By Day 3

Post a 300- to 500-word response in which you address the following:

  • Provide the full DSM-5 diagnosis for the client. Remember, a full diagnosis should include the name of the disorder, ICD-10-CM code, specifiers, severity, and the Z codes (other conditions that may be a focus of clinical attention). Keep in mind a diagnosis covers the most recent 12 months.
  • Explain the diagnosis by matching the symptoms identified in the case to the specific criteria for the diagnosis.
  • Explain why it is important to use an interprofessional approach in treatment. Identity specific professionals you would recommend for the team, and describe how you might best utilize or focus their services.
  • Explain how you would use the client’s family to support recovery. Include specific behavioral examples.
  • Select and explain an evidence-based, focused treatment approach that you might use in your part of the overall treatment plan.
  • Explain how culture and diversity influence these disorders. Consider how gender, age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and/or ethnicity/race affect the experience of living with an eating disorder.    

Note: You do not need to include an APA reference to the DSM-5 in your response. However, your response should clearly be informed by the DSM-5, demonstrating an understanding of the risks and benefits of treatment to the client. You do need to include an APA reference for the treatment approach and any other resources you use to support your response.

The Case of Shannel

Intake Date: August 2021

DEMOGRAPHIC DATA: This was a voluntary intake for this 28-year-old single African American female. Shannel lives with a 24-year-old female roommate in New York City. She has a bachelor’s degree in Art History and is employed by a major New York museum. Shannel was born and raised in Virginia and moved to New York 4 years ago for employment.

CHIEF COMPLAINT: “My roommate suggested I go to therapy. I do not agree. I can handle my life, but she threatened to move out and I cannot afford the apartment by myself.”

HISTORY OF PRESENT ILLNESS: Shannel admitted to purging and frequent use of laxatives to try and keep her weight down. Shannel reported her weight was being monitored by a nutritionist and she had lab work done to be sure she remained healthy. Shannel reports that she was much heavier as a teenager and wants to confirm she doesn’t get like that again.

Shannel reported that she has a very stressful job. She stated that approximately one month ago she started to have difficulty concentrating at work. She had several altercations with coworkers as well. Several weeks ago Shannel reported that a coworker “said something nasty and I lost it.” Shannel reported that she was angry and “hit everything I knew I could—but that did not help.” Shannel also reported being under stress due to applying for her master’s degree in art history and difficulties with her boyfriend.

Shannel complained of depression with insomnia and sleeping only a few hours per night, feeling confused, decreased concentration, irritability, anger, and frustration. She admitted to suicidal ideation. She complained of feeling paranoid over the past few weeks and believed the police were after her and that she heard them outside her door. This was another reason her roommate wanted her to seek treatment. Shannel reported she was emotionally abused as a child and suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, but she denied a history of flashbacks or nightmares or any avoidance of the person who she says emotionally abused her..

Shannel noted that at times over the past year she has very strange experiences of being overwhelmed with fear. At these times she begins sweating, has chest pains and chills, and thinks she is going crazy. It concerns her terribly that these may happen at inappropriate times. Reluctantly, Shannel admitted to bingeing several times per month since she was 17-years-old.

PAST PSYCHIATRIC HISTORY: Shannel denies any history of psychiatric problems in the past. Shannel admits to using alcohol periodically but rarely to excess.

MEDICAL HISTORY: Shannel is allergic to penicillin and has a lactose intolerance. She wears glasses for reading.

PSYCHOSOCIAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL HISTORY: Shannel’s parents were married when her mother was 19-years-old, and Shannel was born the following year. Two years later, Shannel’s sister was born. Shannel reports her mother stated Shannel’s personality changed; she became stubborn and difficult. Shannel’s mother said that Shannel began biting, having temper tantrums, and has been moody since then. Shannel states she “adores her father” because he was never the disciplinarian. When Shannel was 12-years-old, her parents separated for 2 weeks. Shannel reported her mother quit college after Shannel’s birth and returned to college after her sister’s birth. She said her father worked all the time, and there was a housekeeper who cared for the children.

Shannel reports that when she was in high school, her maternal aunt, who was dying of cancer, came to live with the family and this was very stressful for the family. During those years, Shannel told the school counselor that her mother was abusive, and school officials visited the family. During the visit, Shannel had a temper tantrum and there was no further investigation.

Currently, Shannel is friendly with her roommate but does not have many other friends. “I don’t trust anybody.” Shannel states that when she lived in Connecticut during college, she had many friends.

Shannel worked during summer vacation while in high school. She baby sat during college and worked as a graduate assistant. Since graduating from college, Shannel has been employed by a museum. Shannel reports she currently has financial problems due to living in New York.

MENTAL STATUS EXAMINATION: Shannel presented as a slightly overweight, somewhat disheveled, African-American female. She was relaxed but very restless during the interview. Her facial expression was mobile. Her affect during the initial interview was constricted and her mood dysphoric. Shannel’s speech was pressured, and she spoke in a loud voice. At times, her thinking was logical; and at other times, it was illogical. Shannel denied hallucinations but complained of hearing policemen outside her door sometimes. She denied homicidal ideation. She initially admitted to suicidal ideation but then denied it.

Shannel was oriented to person, place, and time. Her fund of knowledge was excellent. Shannel was able to calculate serial sevens easily and accurately. Shannel repeated 7 digits forward and 3 in reverse. Her recent and remote memory was intact, and she recalled 3 items after five minutes. Shannel was able to give appropriate interpretations for 3 of 3 proverbs. Her social and personal judgment was appropriate. Shannel’s three wishes were: “To be skinny, to have a big house where I can take in all the stray cats, and for a million more wishes.” When asked how she sees herself in 5 years, Shannel replied, “Hopefully graduating from graduate school.” If Shannel could change something about herself, she would “make myself thin.”

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How to Write a Diagnosis According to the DSM-5

An Aid for MSW Students As you write a diagnosis, keep in mind that “[there] are specific recording protocols for these diagnostic codes…to insure consistent, international recording” (American Psychiatric Association, 2013, p. 23).

Writing a Diagnosis A diagnosis is written as a simple list in order of priority to the current treatment needs.

F33.1 Major depressive disorder, moderate, recurrent, with seasonal pattern F41.1 Generalized anxiety disorder Z60.3 Acculturation difficulty

Each diagnosis needs an ICD code that is written before the name of the diagnosis. The older (DSM-IV-TR) names of some disorders can sometimes be found after the current name. However, to avoid confusion, only use the current name for the illness in a diagnosis. ICD Codes The DSM-5 includes codes for the International Classification of Diseases. Both ICD-9 and ICD-10 are included in the DSM-5. Always ignore the ICD-9 codes and use only the ICD-10-CM codes in diagnosis. The ICD-10-CM codes are listed inside the parentheses in the screen shot below.

HOW TO CODE

For mental health conditions, codes always start with a letter (usually F), followed by 2– 6 digits. A code is not valid unless it has been coded to the full number of digits required. A code with only the first three digits is used only if that condition is not further subdivided within the DSM-5. For example, for schizophrenia, there are no additional characters in spaces 4, 5, 6, and 7.

F20.9 Schizophrenia In other cases, numbers must be added in the 4th, 5th, or 6th spaces to individualize a condition. Spaces 4–6 provide greater detail of causes, location details, and severity. For example, here are two codes for mania:

F30.10 Manic episode without psychotic symptoms, unspecified

F30.11 Manic episode without psychotic symptoms, mild 


Many disorders have more than one ICD code when there are common, clearly identified subtypes to the illness. The diagnostic criteria box always tells you if a code must be subdivided. If you do not see a code at the top of the diagnostic criteria box, look for the correct codes at the bottom of the box. Often the box prompts for further individualization by saying “Specify if” or “Specify whether.” You may also be asked to set a severity level. The wording “specify whether” tells you that the subtypes that follow are mutually exclusive. For example, here are two subtypes for schizoaffective disorder: F25.0 Schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type F25.1 Schizoaffective disorder, depressive type

Always check for coding notes for further directions. For example, in addition to our subtypes for schizoaffective disorder, if catatonia is present, an additional code is found in the coding note.

Now our diagnosis looks like this: F25.0 Schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type F06.1 Catatonia (associated with another mental disorder) After the subtype for schizoaffective disorder is identified, the diagnostic box requires even more individualization: “Specify if” is followed by “Specify current severity.” These terms prompt the clinician to further detail the course of the illness and the way to measure the severity of a presentation. F25.0 Schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type, multiple episodes, currently in acute episode, symptom severity F06.1 Catatonia (associated with another mental disorder) Some disorders such as the substance/medication-induced disorders have more complex codes for their subtypes. When this happens, there is always a table and a coding note found at the bottom of the diagnostic criteria box. Be aware that some diagnoses use the same code because the ICD has limitations that are already being updated for ICD-11. Always check the Centers for Medicare and

Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Center for Health Statistics for updated coding on those disorders that share a code. HOW TO LIST MULTIPLE CODES Formal DSM-5 diagnosis combines into one list all relevant mental disorders, including personality disorders, disabilities, and other relevant medical diagnoses. The DSM-5 also expands the psychosocial stressors that a patient might be experiencing. These are now called “other conditions that are a focus of treatment,” and most of them begin with the letter “Z.” These conditions, which are critical to psychosocial treatment (formerly known as the V codes), are found on p. 715 in the manual. In a diagnostic list, always place the principal diagnosis first (the reason for the visit, if in an outpatient setting). Other mental health co-morbid diagnoses follow in order of priority to the treatment or focus of attention.

1. RULE A: In this diagnostic list, a mental disorder was the reason for the visit, with the client experiencing an additional medical condition unrelated to the mental disorder diagnosis. Other psychosocial factors relevant to the service are listed after mental health conditions and physical conditions:

F40.00 Agoraphobia K7030 Alcoholic cirrhosis of liver without ascites (by patient report) Z60.3 Acculturation difficulty Z72.0 Tobacco use disorder, mild (nicotine use)

The order of priority above is (a) principal mental health diagnosis, (b) medical factors, and (c) psychosocial needs.

2. RULE B: If the client above has a clinical diagnosis of a mental health problem as

the principal diagnosis (all F codes), with the presence of a second, additional mental disorder but without the medical problem of cirrhosis, the diagnosis looks like this: F40.00 Agoraphobia F50.01 Anorexia nervosa, restricting subtype Z60.3 Acculturation difficulty. Z72.0 Tobacco use disorder, mild (nicotine use)

3. RULE C: An exception to rules A and B occurs only when the “other medical condition” is thought to be causing the mental disorder. In such cases, the medical condition should be listed first. Here, damage to the liver is also causing a neurocognitive disorder.

K7030 Alcoholic cirrhosis of liver without ascites F10.988 Mild neurocognitive disorder, without alcohol use

Z60.3 Acculturation difficulty Z72.0 Tobacco use disorder, mild (nicotine use)

OTHER CONVENTIONS In diagnosis, a clinician must first rule out if the condition is being caused by a physical illness, then if it is caused by a substance use problem, and only then are mental disorders investigated. A diagnosis should only be provided once a comprehensive assessment has been completed. The DSM-5 has online assessment measures to help in diagnosis. In older diagnostics, clinicians used “diagnosis deferred” (799.9 in ICD-9) when they were not ready to assign a diagnosis. There is no analogous code in the ICD-10; instead, a clinician should use “provisional” or “other specified disorder,” when appropriate. A provisional diagnosis is preferred for mental health conditions, if the reason for delaying diagnosis is that sufficient criteria to meet diagnostic category is not documentable because of limited assessment. The APA (2013) tells clinicians to use a provisional diagnosis “when you have a strong ‘presumption’ that the full criteria will ultimately be met for a disorder but not enough information is available to make a firm diagnosis” (p. 23). The word provisional simply follows the full diagnostic label:

F40.00 Agoraphobia, provisional When symptoms are present but do not meet all the criteria needed for a diagnosis, such as when symptoms are mixed or below the diagnostic threshold but are causing significant distress, most chapters in the DSM-5 have an “Other Specified Disorder” category. If used, the clinician then specifies the presentation according to specifiers provided in the diagnostic box. For example, there are several options for F28 Other Specified Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorder, one of example of which is shown below:

F28 Other specified schizophrenia spectrum disorder, persistent auditory hallucinations

While each chapter in the DSM-5 has an “UNSPECIFIED” code, clinicians are asked not to use this in routine treatment situations. Insurance carriers have variable rules about this label. The CMS actually designed the term for situations in which there is insufficient information to make a diagnosis—for example, in settings like emergency rooms. If you are using “UNSPECIFIED,” be prepared for many insurance carriers to deny services and payments on the basis that there is no “medical necessity” present.

While all social workers need to know how to read and interpret diagnoses, state laws determine if you can provide a direct diagnosis yourself. In most states, Licensed Clinical Social Workers do assess and diagnose. Please look up your state laws. References American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental

disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. American Psychiatric Association. (2018). DSM–5 frequently asked questions.

Retrieved from https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/practice/dsm/feedback- and-questions/frequently-asked-questions

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017a). ICD-10-CM official guidelines for

coding and reporting: FY 2017 (October 1, 2016–September 30, 2017). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/icd/10cmguidelines_2017_final.pdf

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017b). International classification of

diseases, tenth revision, clinical modification (ICD-10-CM). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2017). Provider resources. Retrieved

from https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/ProviderResources.html Material in this guide has been adapted from the referenced materials by Dr. Diane H. Ranes, PhD, LCSW.

,

DIAGNOSTIC AND STATISTICAL MANUAL OF

MENTAL DISORDERS F I F T H E D I T I O N

DSM-5TM

American Psychiatric Association

Officers 2012-2013 P residen t D ilip V. J este, M.D.

P resid en t-Elect J effrey A. Lieberm a n , M.D. Tr ea su rer Da v id F a ssler, M.D.

Secreta ry R cxser Peele, M.D.

Assembly Spea k er R. Sc o tt B en so n , M.D.

S peaker-Elect M elin da L. Yo u n g , M.D.

Board o f Trustees Jeffrey A ka ka, M .D.

C aro l A. B ern stein, M.D. B rL·̂ ̂C ro w ley, M.D.

An ita S. Everett, M.D. J effrey G eller, M .D., M .P.H .

M ^ c D a v id G ra ff, M.D. ' J ^ e&A. G i^ eneVM.D. Ju d ith F. Ka sh ta n , M.D. M o lly K. M c Vo y, M .D. J a m es E. N in in g er, M.D. Jo h n M. O ldh a m , M .D.

A lan F. Sc h a tzberg , M.D. A lik s . W id g e, M .D., P h .D.

E r ik R. V an d erlip, M .D ., M em ber-in-T raining Tr u stee-E lect

DIAGNOSTIC AND STATISTICAL MANUAL OF

MENTAL DISORDERS7 F I F T H E D I T I O N

DSM-5TM

New School Library

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Amcriccin

O svch iatric

ADivi«ono(AmCT»MlVhijtiKAMod<tk>n

W ashin g ton , DC Lon d on , E n gland

Copyright © 2013 American Psychiatric Association

DSM and DSM-5 are trademarks of the American Psychiatric Association. Use of these terms is prohibited without permission of the American Psychiatric Association.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Unless authorized in writing by the APA, no part of this book may be reproduced or used in a manner inconsistent with the APA's copyright. This prohibition apphes to unauthorized uses or reproductions in any form, including electronic applications.

Correspondence regarding copyright permissions should be directed to DSM Permissions, American Psychiatric Publishing, 1000 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1825, Arlington, VA 22209­ 3901.

Manufactured in the United States of America on acid-free paper.

ISBN 978-0-89042-554-1 (Hardcover)

ISBN 978-0-89042-555-8 (Paperback)

American Psychiatric Association 1000 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22209-3901 www.psych.org

The correct citation for this book is American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statisti­ cal Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Associa­ tion, 2013.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders : DSM-5. — 5th ed.

p. ; cm. DSM-5 DSM-V Includes index. ISBN 978-0-89042-554-1 (hardcover : alk. paper) — ISBN 978-0-89042-555-8 (pbk. : alk. paper) I. American Psychiatric Association. II. American Psychiatric Association. DSM-5 Task Force, m. Title: DSM-5. IV. Title: DSM-V. [DNLM: 1. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. 2. Mental Disorders— classification. 3. Mental Disorders—diagnosis. WM 15] RC455.2.C4 616.89Ό75—dc23

2013011061 British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data ^ n A CIP record is available from the British Library. ^

Text Design—Tammy J. Cordova

Manufacturing—Edwards Brothers Malloy ^

cH

Contents

DSM-5 Classification…………………………………………………………xiii Preface…………………………………………………………………………….. xli

Section I DSM-5 Basics

Introduction……………………………………………………………………….. 5

Use of the M anual………………………………………………………………19

Cautionary Statement for Forensic Use of DSM-5………………… 25

Section II Diagnostic Criteria and Codes

Neurodevelopmental Disorders………………………………………….. 31 Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders……….87 Bipolar and Related Disorders………………………………………….. 123 Depressive Disorders………………………………………………………. 155 Anxiety Disorders………………………………………………………………189 Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders………………….. 235 Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders…………………………… 265 Dissociative Disorders…………………………………………………….. 291 Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders…………………………. 309 Feeding and Eating Disorders………………………………………….. 329 Elimination Disorders………………………………………………………. 355 Sleep-Wake Disorders………………………………………………………. 361 Sexual Dysfunctions…………………………………………………………423 Gender Dysphoria…………………………………………………………….451

Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders…………..461 Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders……………………… 481 Neurocognitive Disorders…………………………………………………. 591 Personality Disorders………………………………………………………. 645 Paraphilic Disorders………………………………………………………… 685 Other Mental Disorders…………………………………………………… 707

Medication-Induced Movement Disorders and Other Adverse Effects of M edication……………………….. 709

Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention .. 715

Section III Emerging Measures and Models

Assessment Measures…………………………………………………….. 733

Cultural Formulation………………………………………………………… 749

Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders…………….761

Conditions for Further Study……………………………………………. 783

Appendix Highlights of Changes From DSM-IV to DSM -5………………….. 809 Glossary of Technical Term s……………………………………………. 817 Glossary of Cultural Concepts of Distress…………………………. 833 Alphabetical Listing of DSM-5 Diagnoses and Codes

(ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM)……………………………………………. 839 Numerical Listing of DSM-5 Diagnoses and Codes

(ICD-9-CM)………………………………………………………………….. 863 Numerical Listing of DSM-5 Diagnoses and Codes

(ICD-10-CM)………………………………………………………………….877 DSM-5 Advisors and Other Contributors…………………………… 897

Index………………………………………………………………………………. 917

DSM-5 Task Force D a vid J. K u pfer, M.D.

Task Force Chair D a rrel A. R egier, M .D., M .P.H .

Task Force Vice-Chair William E. Narrow, M.D.,

Research Director

Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. Jack D. Burke Jr., M.D., M.P.H. William T. Carpenter Jr., M.D. F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D. Wilson M. Compton, M.D., M.P.E. Joel E. Dimsdale, M.D. Javier I. Escobar, M.D., M.Sc. Jan A. Fawcett, M.D. Bridget F. Grant, Ph.D., Ph.D. (2009-) Steven E. Hyman, M.D. (2007-2012) Dilip V. Jeste, M.D. (2007-2011) Helena C. Kraemer, Ph.D. Daniel T. Mamah, M.D., M.P.E. James P. McNulty, A.B., Sc.B. Howard B. Moss, M.D. (2007-2009)

Susan K. Schultz, M.D., Text Editor Emily A. Kuhl, Ph.D., APA Text Editor

Charles P. O'Brien, M.D., Ph.D. Roger Peele, M.D. Katharine A. Phillips, M.D. Daniel S. Pine, M.D. Charles F. Reynolds III, M.D. Maritza Rubio-Stipec, Sc.D. David Shaffer, M.D. Andrew E. Skodol II, M.D. Susan E. Swedo, M.D. B. Timothy Walsh, M.D. Philip Wang, M.D., Dr.P.H. (2007-2012) William M. Womack, M.D. Kimberly A. Yonkers, M.D. Kenneth J. Zucker, Ph.D. Norman Sartorius, M.D., Ph.D., Consultant

APA Division of Research Staff on DSIVI-5 Darrel A. Regier, M.D., M.P.H.,

Director, Division o f Research William E. Narrow, M.D., M.P.H.,

Associate Director Emily A. Kuhl, Ph.D., Senior Science

Writer; Staff Text Editor Diana E. Clarke, Ph.D., M.Sc., Research

Statistician

Lisa H. Greiner, M.S.S.A., DSM-5 Field Trials Project Manager

Eve K. Moscicki, Sc.D., M.P.H., Director, Practice Research Network

S. Janet Kuramoto, Ph.D. M.H.S., Senior Scientific Research Associate, Practice Research Network

Amy Porfiri, M.B.A. Director o f Finance and Administration

Jennifer J. Shupinka, Assistant Director, DSM Operations

Seung-Hee Hong, DSM Senior Research Associate

Anne R. Hiller, DSM Research Associate Alison S. Beale, DSM Research Associate Spencer R. Case, DSM Research Associate

Joyce C. West, Ph.D., M.P.P., Health Policy Research Director, Practice Research Network

Farifteh F. Duffy, Ph.D., Quality Care Research Director, Practice Research Network

Lisa M. Countis, Field Operations Manager, Practice Research Network

Christopher M. Reynolds, Executive Assistant

APA Office of the IVIedlcal Director Jam es H. S c u l l y Jr ., M.D.

Medical Director and CEO

Editorial and Coding Consultants Michael B. First, M.D. Maria N. Ward, M.Ed., RHIT, CCS-P

DSM-5 Work Groups ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

D a v id Sha ffer, M.D. Chair

F. Xa v ier C a stella n o s, M.D. Co-Chair

Paul J. Frick, Ph.D., Text Coordinator Luis Augusto Rohde, M.D., Sc.D. Glorisa Canino, Ph.D. Rosemary Tannock, Ph.D. Terrie E. Moffitt, Ph.D. Eric A. Taylor, M.B. Joel T. Nigg, Ph.D. Richard Todd, Ph.D., M.D. (d. 2008)

Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders

K a th a rin e A. Ph illips, M.D. Chair

Michelle G. Craske, Ph.D., Text Scott L. Rauch, M.D. Coordinator H. Blair Simpson, M.D., Ph.D.

J. Gavin Andrews, M.D. David Spiegel, M.D. Susan M. Bögels, Ph.D. Dan J. Stein, M.D., Ph.D. Matthew J. Friedman, M.D., Ph.D. Murray B. Stein, M.D. Eric Hollander, M.D. (2007-2009) Robert J. Ursano, M.D. Roberto Lewis-Fernandez, M.D., M.T.S. Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Ph.D. Robert S. Pynoos, M.D., M.P.H.

Childhood and Adolescent Disorders D an iel S. Pin e, M.D.

Chair Ronald E. Dahl, M.D. James F. Leckman, M.D. E. Jane Costello, Ph.D. (2007-2009) Ellen Leibenluft, M.D. Regina Smith James, M.D. Judith H. L. Rapoport, M.D. Rachel G. Klein, Ph.D. Charles H. Zeanah, M.D.

Eating Disorders B. T im o th y W alsh, M.D.

Chair Stephen A. Wonderlich, Ph.D., Richard E. Kreipe, M.D.

Text Coordinator Marsha D. Marcus, Ph.D. Evelyn Attia, M.D. James E. Mitchell, M.D. Anne E. Becker, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.M. Ruth H. Striegel-Moore, Ph.D. Rachel Bryant-Waugh, M.D. G. Terence Wilson, Ph.D. Hans W. Hoek, M.D., Ph.D. Barbara E. Wolfe, Ph.D. A.P.R.N.

Mood Disorders J a n a . F a w c e t t , M.D.

Chair Ellen Frank, Ph.D., Text Coordinator Jules Angst, M.D. (2007-2008) William H. Coryell, M.D. Lori L. Davis, M.D. Raymond J. DePaulo, M.D. Sir David Goldberg, M.D. James S. Jackson, Ph.D.

Kenneth S. Kendler, M.D., Ph.D. (2007-2010)

Mario Maj, M.D., Ph.D. Husseini K. Manji, M.D. (2007-2008) Michael R. Phillips, M.D. Trisha Suppes, M.D., Ph.D. Carlos A. Zarate, M.D.

Neurocognitive Disorders D ilip V. Je s te , M .D. (2007-2011)

Chair Emeritus D an G. Bla zer, M .D., P h .D., M.P.H.

Chair R o n a l d C. P e te r s e n , M .D., Ph.D.

Co-Chair Mary Ganguli, M.D., M.P.H.,

Text Coordinator Deborah Blacker, M.D., Sc.D. Warachal Faison, M.D. (2007-2008)

Igor Grant, M.D. Eric J. Lenze, M.D. Jane S. Paulsen, Ph.D. Perminder S. Sachdev, M.D., Ph.D.

Neurodevelopmental Disorders Su sa n E. Sw ed o , M.D.

Chair Gillian Baird, M.A., M.B., B.Chir.,

Text Coordinator Edwin H. Cook Jr., M.D. Francesca G. Happé, Ph.D. James C. Harris, M.D. Walter E. Kaufmann, M.D. Bryan H. King, M.D.

Catherine E. Lord, Ph.D. Joseph Piven, M.D. Sally J. Rogers, Ph.D. Sarah J. Spence, M.D., Ph.D. Fred Volkmar, M.D. (2007-2009) Amy M. Wetherby, Ph.D. Harry H. Wright, M.D.

Personality and Personality Disorders^ A n d rew E. Sk o d o l, M.D.

Chair Joh n M. O l d h a m , M.D.

Co-Chair Robert F. Krueger, Ph.D., Text

Coordinator Renato D. Alarcon, M.D., M.P.H. Carl C. Bell, M.D. Donna S. Bender, Ph.D.

Lee Anna Clark, Ph.D. W. John Livesley, M.D., Ph.D. (2007-2012) Leslie C. Morey, Ph.D. Larry J. Siever, M.D. Roel Verheul, Ph.D. (2008-2012)

̂The members of the Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group are responsible for the alternative DSM-5 model for personality disorders that is included in Section III. The Section II personality disorders criteria and text (with updating of the text) are retained from DSM-IV-TR.

Psychotic Disorders W illiam T. C arpen ter J r ., M.D.

Chair Deanna M. Barch, Ph.D., Text Dolores Malaspina, M.D., M.S.P.H.

Coordinator Michael J. Owen, M.D., Ph.D. Juan R. Bustillo, M.D. Susan K. Schultz, M.D. Wolfgang Gaebel, M.D. Rajiv Tandon, M.D. Raquel E. Gur, M.D., Ph.D. Ming T. Tsuang, M.D., Ph.D. Stephan H. Heckers, M.D. Jim van Os, M.D.

Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders K en n eth J. Zu c k er, Ph .D.

Chair Lori Brotto, Ph.D., Text Coordinator Martin P. Kafka, M.D. Irving M. Binik, Ph.D. Richard B. Krueger, M.D. Ray M. Blanchard, Ph.D. Niklas Langström, M.D., Ph.D. Peggy T. Cohen-Kettenis, Ph.D. Heino F.L. Meyer-Bahlburg, Dr. rer. nat. Jack Drescher, M.D. Friedemann Pfäfflin, M.D. Cynthia A. Graham, Ph.D. Robert Tayl

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